RSS

Category Archives: God’s Provision

Sin is Not Your Friend

Sin is Not Your Friend

As we continue our look at the book of Romans, we’re now beginning chapter 6. Here Paul starts to show us what Christ has done for us in regard to our sin nature.

What shall we say, then? Shall we go on sinning so that grace may increase? By no means! We died to sin; how can we live in it any longer?

Romans 6:1-3

Before we go further in this section, we need a basic understanding of just what sin is. Many have the idea that the words sin and evil are synonymous. That’s simply not the case.

The fact is, you can sin without doing anything considered evil. Let me explain.

The word, sin, in both the Old and the New Testaments is actually a word that means to miss the mark. You were aiming for a certain target, but you failed to hit it.

What we have to realize is that in life there are hundreds of things that fall into this category. Many of them have nothing to do with evil.

By not understanding the nature of what sin is, many have missed out on the blessings that Christ has purchased for them. The fact is that sin is a package deal. When Adam chose to sin, he embraced a package of “missing the mark.”

He chose the way of imperfection. Unfortunately, now that imperfection is passed down throughout all generations since then. We miss God’s best by not understanding what’s included in the sin package.

Anything that misses God’s perfect will for humanity is a part of the sin package. A good rule of thumb to know if it’s in the package, is to ask; was Adam originally created for it?

For instance, a number of years ago I did a series of posts titled Healing 101. In it I talked about God’s provision of healing for His people. One of the important points was the fact that sickness was a part of the package we call the sin nature.

Adam was not created to ever experience sickness. When he embraced the sin package, sickness entered our world. Sickness misses the mark of the health we were created to enjoy. To read this teaching click here.

Another thing Adam was not created for was poverty. God’s will was for Adam to live with his needs perfectly met. When I get the idea that poverty is somehow a virtue, then I’m getting friendly with sin.

Usually we don’t have a problem identifying the evil aspects of sin. It’s the other areas like sickness, poverty, depression, loneliness, etc., that we fail to recognize as missing the mark of God’s perfect will.

I realize that in context Paul is talking about evil sin. But because the Holy Spirit used the generic word, sin, in this verse it can apply to all the forms it takes, not just evil. This verse tells me not to get comfortable with it even though God can give me the grace to cope with it.

I’ve talked to some people with medical conditions who said that they’d decided not to seek God for their healing. They said that God was giving them the grace to work for Him in spite of their sickness.

Paul is saying here, “Shall we continue in sickness so that grace may increase? By no means!” We shouldn’t get comfortable with our sickness even though the Lord’s helping us cope with it.

We can’t get comfortable missing the mark of God’s best, whether it’s evil or not. Sin is not your friend. Attack it with everything God has given you.

Question: Can you think of some other forms of sin that aren’t necessarily evil?

© 2021 Nick Zaccardi

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 5, 2021 in God's Provision, Spiritual Walk, The Gospel

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

The Joy of Salvation

The Joy of Salvation

We’re continuing through our study of Paul’s letter to the Roman church. We’ve seen the love of God being manifest in us because of the work of righteousness. This is all initiated by our turning to the Lord in faith.

Paul continues this teaching.

Since we have now been justified by his blood, how much more shall we be saved from God’s wrath through him!

Romans 5:9-10

This verse brings us to the next great blessing of our salvation. Now that we’ve been made righteous and justified by His blood, we’ve also been saved from His wrath.

This word, saved or sozo in the Greek language, is huge in regard to our faith. Our salvation means more than just being saved from a future in hell.

Just then a woman who had been subject to bleeding for twelve years came up behind him and touched the edge of his cloak. She said to herself, “If I only touch his cloak, I will be healed.”

Jesus turned and saw her. “Take heart, daughter,” he said, “your faith has healed you.” And the woman was healed from that moment.

Matthew 9:20-22

The word that’s translated healed in this verse is the word sozo. Our salvation also includes being saved from sickness.

Those who had seen it told the people how the demon-possessed man had been cured.

Luke 8:36

Again, the word translated as cured, is the word sozo. Salvation also includes deliverance and protection from the enemy.

There’s so much that’s included in that word. Everything Christ purchased on the cross is all wrapped up in our salvation package.

So, when Scripture says that we’re saved from God’s wrath, it’s a powerful statement. I don’t ever have to be afraid that God’s mad at me. His love for me is unbreakable.

For God did not appoint us to suffer wrath but to receive salvation through our Lord Jesus Christ.

1Thessalonians 5:9

As Paul continues his teaching, he shows us the foolishness is thinking that God is mad at us.

For if, when we were God’s enemies, we were reconciled to him through the death of his Son, how much more, having been reconciled, shall we be saved through his life! Not only is this so, but we also rejoice in God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom we have now received reconciliation.

Romans 5:10-11

Too many people, believers included, think that God is sitting in Heaven just waiting for us to slip up. They’re afraid that one little mistake will take away all the blessings that the Lord has for them.

Paul shows that this kind of thinking is foolish. If Christ treated us this way when we were His enemies – He died for us – how could He ever treat us worse now that we’re reconciled?

He’s looking to impart His life into us. That life brings the total package of salvation He wants us to receive.

Furthermore, it’s something to rejoice about. We should live in an attitude of rejoicing because we serve a God who only wants the best for us.

Question: What can you rejoice about in the salvation you’ve received from the Lord?

© 2021 Nick Zaccardi

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Weak vs. Strong Faith

Weak vs. Strong Faith

We’re continuing to look at the example of Abraham.  He’s Paul’s illustration of how we should walk in faith.

Against all hope, Abraham in hope believed and so became the father of many nations, just as it had been said to him, “So shall your offspring be.”

Romans 4:18

This is one of those amazing verses in the Scripture.  To fully grasp it, we need to understand what the meaning of hope is in the Bible.

When we use the word, hope, it usually means that we’re wishing for something good to happen.  “I hope I win the lottery.”

That’s not what this word means in the context of Scripture.  It actually means to look forward to with expectation.  “I place my hope in the fact that the sun will come up tomorrow.”

With this knowledge, we can see how Abraham operated.  He was in a situation where, logically, there was nothing to expect.  Yet, by placing his faith in God’s Word, he fully expected to have a multitude of offspring.

Without weakening in his faith, he faced the fact that his body was as good as dead — since he was about a hundred years old — and that Sarah’s womb was also dead.

Romans 4:19

This is the tough part.  I talked about not walking in denial in my last post.  That’s the key to this kind of faith.

The verse literally says that Abraham fully observed the facts of his situation.  He was almost 100 years old and considered himself already dead.  He understood that under no circumstances could his wife, Sarah, have any children.

As a matter of fact, he had already picked out an heir for his estate.  He chose one of his most trusted servants (Genesis 15:2-3).

What amazes me is that even though he had all of these facts before him, he didn’t weaken his faith.  But that brings up an interesting question.  He already had an heir picked out that was not in his family.  How can you say that he didn’t weaken his faith?

We need to understand exactly what is meant by weak faith.  There’s a clear verse about it.

Accept him whose faith is weak, without passing judgment on disputable matters.  One man’s faith allows him to eat everything, but another man, whose faith is weak, eats only vegetables.

Romans 14:1-2

What is weak faith?  It means that you don’t trust God to complete His work in you.  You feel that you have to establish rules to follow so that you won’t accidentally sin.  Weak faith has the idea that if I follow these rules, then I’ll please God and receive His blessing.

Abraham picked out an heir without weakening his faith.  That tells me that I do what I need to do as if nothing special will happen.  But, at the same time, I fully expect the Lord to intervene on my behalf.

I can see my doctor, take my pills, and pay my bills.  At the same time I trust God for my health and provision.

Some people think that they’re operating in faith by never seeing a doctor.  It’s actually a sign of weak faith because they can’t trust God to manage what the doctor might tell them.

Weak faith has to set rules and boundaries so that we can deny any problems.  Strong faith can look straight at the problems and trust God for the solution.

Question: What are you facing right now that requires faith in God?

© 2021 Nick Zaccardi

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on January 1, 2021 in Faith, God's Provision, Healing, Word of God

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

The Promise

The Promise

In our journey through the book of Romans, we’ve been seeing that we can’t work for righteousness.  It can only come as we put our faith in Christ.

Paul uses the life of Abraham as an example to us.  He is aptly called the father of our faith.  Now Paul brings us another step further along this path.

It was not through law that Abraham and his offspring received the promise that he would be heir of the world, but through the righteousness that comes by faith.

Romans 4:13

The apostle now uses a new word.  This is the first time, in the book of Romans, that Paul mentions the promise.

This is an important word.  It literally means an announcement.  However, a promise from God is not like a promise we’re used to receiving.

For us, a promise is based upon mistrust.  You don’t believe me so I try to gain your trust by saying, “I promise.”

God, on the other hand, makes an announcement of His intentions (We call it a “promise”).  It is absolute truth.  It’s now up to you whether you believe His Word or not.

The good news is that now, all of God’s promises are fulfilled in Christ Jesus.

If you belong to Christ, then you are Abraham’s seed, and heirs according to the promise.

Galatians 3:29

Because of His work on the cross, Christ has fulfilled the requirements for the promises.  This teaching is carried on throughout the New Testament.  It’s not just a verse pulled out of context, but a scriptural theme that has been all but ignored by the church.

Paul continues with this thought.

For if those who live by law are heirs, faith has no value and the promise is worthless, because law brings wrath.  And where there is no law there is no transgression.

Therefore, the promise comes by faith, so that it may be by grace and may be guaranteed to all Abraham’s offspring – not only to those who are of the law but also to those who are of the faith of Abraham.  He is the father of us all.

Romans 4:14-16

This is a foundational passage in our knowledge of how the promises are obtained in Christ.  The blessing is received, not by my working to do the requirements, but by faith in the One who has already fulfilled them.

This truth is not only given to us by Paul, but also by Peter as well.

His divine power has given us everything we need for life and godliness through our knowledge of him who called us by his own glory and goodness.  Through these he has given us his very great and precious promises, so that through them you may participate in the divine nature and escape the corruption in the world caused by evil desires.

2 Peter 1:3-4

The phrase, through these, obviously refers to the glory and goodness of God, not our works of righteousness.  According to this verse, the reason God blesses us is so that we might actually be participants, sharers, in His divine nature.  You will not find the call for us to fulfill the requirements of the promises anywhere in the New Covenant.

If that’s true, then what are the promises for?  We can look at it this way; each promise has two halves.  There are the requirements and the blessing.

According to the New Testament, Jesus came to fulfill the requirements of the promises.  Because of His finished work on the cross, we receive the blessing of the promise because we’re in Him.

Question: Why is it so hard for us to accept that Christ has finished this work on the cross?

© 2020 Nick Zaccardi

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on December 28, 2020 in Faith, God's Provision, Sonship, Spiritual Walk

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Offering of Thanksgiving

Offering of Thanksgiving

Here in the USA, we’re going to be celebrating our Thanksgiving holiday tomorrow.  Many people are spending today in preparation for it.  I want to take this post to give some inspiration as we look forward to it.

Leviticus 7:11-15 talks about the Jewish Law concerning the sacrifice of thanksgiving.  It was one of the voluntary fellowship offerings that they could bring to the Temple.  You may want to read that passage before continuing with this post.

It turns out that the Thanksgiving offering was a meal shared with the priests.  They brought their sacrifice; it was cooked, and then eaten at the Temple.

So in a way, their Thanksgiving was just like ours.  Did you know that a meal can be worship?

So whether you eat or drink or whatever you do, do it all for the glory of God.

1 Corinthians 10:31

Eating together is a sign of fellowship.  When the Lord is involved, it’s a part of our worship.

This is something that we need to get back to in our present day.  I encourage you to make this a part of your celebration.  Make a point to mention this at your dinner table, “This meal is an act of worship.”

Why is that so important?  Eating involves fellowship.  In the Old Testament reference from Leviticus, the root of “fellowship” is the Hebrew word, Shalom.  It’s what we normally translate as peace.

However, it’s much more than that.  Shalom speaks of fullness of life, wholeness, prosperity, safety, and peace with God.  What we need to realize is that Thanksgiving is the celebration of God’s gift to us of shalom.

The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy; I have come that they may have life, and have it to the full.

John 10:10

That’s why Jesus came – so that we could enter into a covenant with Him.  The result is Shalom – fullness of life.  The Thanksgiving meal should celebrate what God has done for you.

Another aspect of the Thanksgiving Offering in the Old Testament was that this offering was not to provide union with God.  It was not used as a guilt offering.

This one simply acknowledged God’s presence.  We need to remember that Thanksgiving is joyfully sharing in God’s presence.

For where two or three come together in my name, there am I with them.”

Matthew 18:20

It should celebrate the gift of joy and fellowship because we’re in the family of God.  The Thanksgiving holiday should be all the more joyful because God is with us.

It’s interesting to note that this sacrifice was always listed last in the Scripture.  Rabbis referred to it as the “concluding sacrifice.”  It’s usually the same with us.  We look back and say God has been faithful.

However, that’s not all there is.

He who sacrifices thank offerings honors me, and he prepares the way so that I may show him the salvation of God.”

Psalm 50:23

Thanksgiving is not only the final part of a blessing.  It’s also the first part of the next blessing. Make your Thanksgiving meal an act of worship this year.  Not by religious show, but with the attitude of worship.  This is a meal celebrating shalom…in God’s presence…finalizing God’s blessing…and preparing for the next.

© 2020 Nick Zaccardi

 
 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Our First Calling

Our First Calling

We’re continuing to go through Paul’s letter to the believers in Rome.  In the introduction of this epistle, he talks about the goal of his writing.

And you also are among those who are called to belong to Jesus Christ.

To all in Rome who are loved by God and called to be saints: Grace and peace to you from God our Father and from the Lord Jesus Christ.

Romans 1:6-7

The first thing Paul does is to make it clear who’s doing the calling.  He literally says that they are called by Jesus Christ.  That brings me to an important point.

Most people read Scripture without ever thinking about the words being used, or the order we find them.  For instance, many believers think that the names “Jesus Christ” and “Christ Jesus” are synonymous and interchangeable.

While I agree that they both refer to the same person, it’s also important to understand their differences.  They speak a lot about what the writer is trying to get across to us.

The name, Jesus, speaks of His earthly body, while Christ refers to His eternal divinity.  So when they’re put together an important union is formed.  It’s all about the Lord’s high priestly office.

Usually, the name Jesus Christ is used when the writer is emphasizing something that’s directed from man to God.  The name, Christ Jesus, directs the emphasis from God to man.

In this passage we are called by Jesus Christ.  That tells me that the emphasis is man to God.  Jesus is calling us so that we can approach God through His work in us.

That’s what this letter to the Roman church is all about.  Paul is taking them on a journey from the outskirts of God’s grace to the inner circle of maturity in Christ.

The next two things Paul talks about are applicable to all people.  That’s the fact that they’re all loved by God and they’re all called to be holy (saints).

This is important because God’s calling is based upon His love for us.  God loves everyone and desires all to come into His salvation.  Unfortunately, not everyone accepts His invitation.  But that doesn’t change the fact that the Lord loves them anyway.

Everyone is also called to be holy – set apart to God.  I explained that term a couple of posts back.  The Lord wants everyone to be a part of His household.  That’s because we’ll never truly be satisfied until we discover our true purpose for living in Christ.

That brings us to the final two parts of what the book of Romans is majoring on.  Paul wants to see them operating in the grace and peace of God.

These are two very important aspects of our walk with God.  Grace is the vertical portion.  We look to God by faith in His Word.  The Lord then responds to our faith by pouring out His grace upon us.

Peace is the horizontal aspect of our spiritual life.  There are many believers who don’t understand this concept.  Peace is that open relationship between God’s people.

It also deals with all the blessings God has provided for me.  This includes, but isn’t limited to, healing, provision, encouragement, and protection.  What we don’t understand about this is that all of these blessings come through other people – the horizontal.

If I’m in need of resources and pray to God to supply my need, these things don’t just fall out of the sky.  They come from other people.

So if I build walls between myself and other Christians, I’m cutting myself off from potential supplies.  I’m also destroying my chance of passing on God’s blessings through my life to others.

We’re all called to come near to God.  That’s where we receive the grace and peace needed to fulfill our earthly ministries.

Question: How have you seen God’s grace and peace at work in your life?

© 2020 Nick Zaccardi

 
 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Free isn’t Always Free

In the closing chapters of his letter to the Corinthians, Paul talks about the other “apostles” (not the 12) that were going around at that time.  The church was comparing Paul with them.  Usually, it was not in a good way.

Paul was a man who understood his weaknesses.  He admitted that he wasn’t a trained speaker like some of these “super-apostles.”

He now talks about another point of comparison.

Was it a sin for me to lower myself in order to elevate you by preaching the gospel of God to you free of charge?
2 Corinthians 11:7

The word, sin, does not always mean something evil.  In this case, it simply means to miss the mark or make a mistake.

Paul asks them; was I wrong to bless you by preaching the Gospel to you without asking for your support.  According to some, it was because Paul wasn’t an apostle, and so had no right for support.

Paul was willing to humble himself.  By doing this he was able to bring the Corinthian church to a higher level in Christ as a result of his preaching.  But was it really free of charge?

I robbed other churches by receiving support from them so as to serve you.  And when I was with you and needed something, I was not a burden to anyone, for the brothers who came from Macedonia supplied what I needed.  I have kept myself from being a burden to you in any way, and will continue to do so.  As surely as the truth of Christ is in me, nobody in the regions of Achaia will stop this boasting of mine.
2 Corinthians 11:8-10

The simple fact is that support for the ministry has to come from somewhere.  It could come from the minister taking a second or third job.  It could come, as in this case, from other supporting churches.

As in all things, God is our ultimate source.  But He uses people to supply our needs.  It doesn’t always have to come from those being ministered to.

That’s why Paul said that he “robbed” other churches.  No, he didn’t take their money at sword point.  It was because they were giving him money with no direct service in return.  Of course, they received God’s blessing for their faithfulness.

This in itself proved that those accusers were wrong.  They were trying to show that Paul had no right to support.  All the while there were churches around the region that not only recognized the Apostle’s gifting but were willing to support it financially.

Why?  Because I do not love you?  God knows I do!  And I will keep on doing what I am doing in order to cut the ground from under those who want an opportunity to be considered equal with us in the things they boast about.
2 Corinthians 11:11-12

God has a way of exalting his faithful servants.  No one even knows the names of these other preachers.  But, because of his willingness to serve, Paul was honored in God’s kingdom.

Question: What is your area of service to God?

© 2020 Nick Zaccardi

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 16, 2020 in God's Provision, Ministry, Missions, The Church

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Giving Results in Thanksgiving

I’ve been posting about the outcome of a lifestyle of giving.  What’s the result of walking regularly in the grace of giving?

We’ve seen how God increases the seed and the harvest of those who sow into His kingdom.  Now Paul continues this thought.

You will be made rich in every way so that you can be generous on every occasion, and through us your generosity will result in thanksgiving to God.
2 Corinthians 9:11

I know there are many who get upset when you talk about God’s abundant financial blessings on the lives of giving Christians.  But, I have to be true to what the Bible says.

This verse literally says that in everything you will be made wealthy.  Of course, in context, he’s talking about sowers.  But this is a verse that you cannot deny or explain away.  It says what it says.

There’s more to it than just getting wealthy.  According to the above verse, there’s a point that this wealth is taking you to.  The purpose of this blessing is to bring you to generosity in all things.

God doesn’t want to bring you a financial blessing just you can sit on a fat bank account.  He wants you to do something with it – be generous with others.

Then, there’s an even further result.  As you bless others, thanksgiving will go up to God.

So there’s a test you can take.  If you have wealth, is it the source of thanksgiving to the Lord?  If not, then you’re not using your finances correctly.

Paul goes on to elaborate on this.

This service that you perform is not only supplying the needs of God’s people but is also overflowing in many expressions of thanks to God.  Because of the service by which you have proved yourselves, men will praise God for the obedience that accompanies your confession of the gospel of Christ, and for your generosity in sharing with them and with everyone else.  And in their prayers for you their hearts will go out to you, because of the surpassing grace God has given you.  Thanks be to God for his indescribable gift!
2 Corinthians 9:12-15

I really need to tell you what Paul means when he says it’s the service that you perform.  He uses very detailed Greek words.  He is actually saying that this is a liturgy of servanthood.

Giving generously is actually a spiritual exercise.  It’s a part of the mature Christian walk with Christ.

The apostle tells us that it’s the proof of your obedience to God.  It shows that your confession of Christ as Lord is not just lip service.

It becomes obvious to all who see you that God is bestowing upon you this grace of giving.  It’s not from your own abilities or actions.  It’s His power working through you.

Thanksgiving to God will be multiplied as others begin to follow your example of giving.  This is truly a great gift to walk in.

Question: How have you experienced God’s blessings?

© 2020 Nick Zaccardi

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on August 26, 2020 in God's Provision, Ministry, Spiritual Walk

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Growers and Consumers

We’re continuing to go through Paul’s second letter to the Corinthian church. He’s talking about the grace of giving and the rewards associated with it.

Now he who supplies seed to the sower and bread for food will also supply and increase your store of seed and will enlarge the harvest of your righteousness.
2 Corinthians 9:10

Paul gives us a good description of the God we serve.  He shares a few important pieces of information.

The first thing he says is that God completely supplies.  He’s not a partial God, but one who does the whole work needed.

The Lord supplies seed to the sower.  That begs the question; what is a sower?  A sower is not someone who puts a few tomato plants in his backyard.  A sower is a farmer whose livelihood depends upon the crops that he sows in the ground.

A sower is someone who is regularly sowing.  They have a lifestyle of planting good seed into good soil.  They also water, weed, and watch over what they sow.

The good news is that God supplies seed for those who are sowers.  Whatever it is that you sow regularly, God will keep you amply supplied.

The next thing Paul says is that God supplies bread for food…or, literally, eating.  That’s for spiritual consumers.  They simply take.  They expect God to do everything for them without putting anything into His kingdom.

Jesus did say we could pray for our daily bread.  But that’s daily.  It’s for people who only want enough to survive.

I believe that the best choice for any Christian is to become a sower.  The rest of the verse is for them.  Someone who’s eating their daily bread has no need for a storehouse of seed.  That’s for those who are intent upon planting.

The Lord promises to increase your storehouse and your harvest.  The more you plant, the more He’ll give you.

But there’s more. The Greek word for increase and enlarge is a word from which we get our English word, choreograph.  In other words, if you’re a sower, God will choreograph things in such a way, that you’ll get more seed and a greater harvest.

That’s why it’s always better to be a sower than a consumer.  The promises of God are better.  What’s more, you’ll live a more fulfilling life.  You’ll be sowing blessings into the lives of many people around you.

Here’s the way Jesus said it…

“Give, and it will be given to you.  A good measure, pressed down, shaken together and running over, will be poured into your lap.  For with the measure you use, it will be measured to you.”
Luke 6:38

That’s how to live in order to be a blessing and be blessed at the same time.

Question: How have you reaped the rewards of giving?

© 2020 Nick Zaccardi

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on August 24, 2020 in God's Provision, Ministry, Spiritual Walk

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

The Liberality of God

We’ve been looking at Paul’s view of giving.  He’s talked about sowing and reaping as well as giving from the heart.  Now he’ll show us the results of giving into God’s work.

And God is able to make all grace abound to you, so that in all things at all times, having all that you need, you will abound in every good work.
2 Corinthians 9:8

This is an incredible promise to us.  It describes the attitude of God toward His faithful children.

I know that a lot of Christians don’t like to hear this teaching.  They believe in a God of “just enough”.  They’re trusting God for just enough so they can get by.

That’s actually the most selfish attitude you could have.  You’re only thinking of yourself.

The truth is that God wants to abundantly bless you.  Not so that you can have all kinds of stuff you never use.  God wants to bless you so that you can be a blessing.

Look at how Paul describes our God.  The first thing he tells us is that God is powerful enough.  All power in heaven and earth belongs to Him, and He can use it however it pleases Him.

The Lord uses that power to cause all of His grace to super-abound toward us.  Please remember that grace is not some ethereal cloud around us.  Specifically, grace is God’s response to our faith. (Romans 5:1-2)

That word, super-abound, is important.  It means to be in excess in quantity and/or quality.  In other words, God wants to give you an excessive amount of His grace – that’s more than you’ll need in your situation.

However, God has a reason that He gives you too much of His grace.  He has an ulterior motive.  The Lord wants you to do something.  In everything you do, at all times, He wants you to super-abound in the good work you’re doing.

That means God wants you to do excessively good works.  He wants you to go over and above what people expect.  Then, when people ask why you’re doing this, you can point to your excessively super-abundant God.

I know that there are some people who would say, “Wait a minute.  The verse says ‘all that you need’.  I told you God only gives you what you need.”

No!  You took the verse out of context.  It says that God gives you all you need to do your good works excessively.  Paul illustrates this with an Old Testament quote.

As it is written: “He has scattered abroad his gifts to the poor; his righteousness endures forever.”
2 Corinthians 9:9

The word, scattered, in this verse means to disperse liberally.  It implies that God is scattering to the point where it appears to be wasteful.  That’s the God we serve.

If you’re a giver seeking to please and obey God, then He will faithfully and liberally supply all you need.  Not just to bless you, but so you can bless others as well.

Question: How have you been a blessing to others lately?

© 2020 Nick Zaccardi

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on August 21, 2020 in Faith, God's Provision, Ministry, Power of God

 

Tags: , , , , ,